Participants

Angela Y. Davis

Through her activism and scholarship over many decades, Angela Davis has been deeply involved in movements for social justice around the world. Her work as an educator – both at the university level and in the larger public sphere – has always emphasized the importance of building communities of struggle for economic, racial, and gender justice.

Professor Davis’ teaching career has taken her to San Francisco State University, Mills College, and UC Berkeley. She also has taught at UCLA, Vassar, Syracuse University the Claremont Colleges, and Stanford University. Most recently she spent fifteen years at the University of California Santa Cruz where she is now Distinguished Professor Emerita of History of Consciousness – an interdisciplinary Ph.D program – and of Feminist Studies.

Angela Davis is the author of ten books and has lectured throughout the United States as well as in Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia, and South America. In recent years a persistent theme of her work has been the range of social problems associated with incarceration and the generalized criminalization of those communities that are most affected by poverty and racial discrimination. She draws upon her own experiences in the early seventies as a person who spent eighteen months in jail and on trial, after being placed on the FBI’s “Ten Most Wanted List.” She also has conducted extensive research on numerous issues related to race, gender and imprisonment. Her recent books include Abolition Democracy and Are Prisons Obsolete? about the abolition of the prison industrial complex, a new edition of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, and a collection of essays entitled The Meaning of Freedom. Her most recent book of essays, called Freedom Is a Constant Struggle: Ferguson, Palestine, and the Foundations of a Movement, was published in February 2016.

Angela Davis is a founding member of Critical Resistance, a national organization dedicated to the dismantling of the prison industrial complex. Internationally, she is affiliated with Sisters Inside, an abolitionist organization based in Queensland, Australia that works in solidarity with women in prison.

Like many educators, Professor Davis is especially concerned with the general tendency to devote more resources and attention to the prison system than to educational institutions. Having helped to popularize the notion of a “prison industrial complex,” she now urges her audiences to think seriously about the future possibility of a world without prisons and to help forge a 21st century abolitionist movement.


Program:

Sunday, 13.05.18
19:30 – 21:30  Public Dialogue: Radical Solidarity and Intergenerational Coalitions

Thursday, 17.05.18
19:00 – 21:00  Keynote Lecture Angela Davis

The Black Archives

Program:

Monday, 14.05.18
16:00 – 19:00  Activism, Art and Education Lounge

Tuesday, 15.05.18
16:00 – 19:00  Activism, Art and Education Lounge

Wednesday, 16.05.18
19:00 – 21:00  Lecture Gina Dent: Anchored to the Real: Black Literature in the Wake of Anthropology

Benedicta

Benedicta is a masterstudent who is currently studying governance of migration and diversity at the Erasmus university. She’s always been interested in the African diaspora but is also a big Marvel fan! And she loves science fiction.


Program:

Thursday, 17.05.18
19:00 – 21:00  Keynote Lecture Angela Davis

Chihiro Geuzebroek

Chihiro Geuzebroek(1983) was born and raised in Amsterdam. After completing a course Production Assistant at the Dutch Film Academy she got her BA in film studies at the University of Amsterdam. After filming during the UN Climate Summit in Copenhagen 2009, she went to Bolivia to direct her first Climate Justice featurefilm: Radical Friends, an activist coming of age story. After the festival release she started filming for Fossil Free Culture direct action performances as well as the Code Rood Climate Action Collective. She participated in Ende Gelande coal mine shutdowns in Germany three years in a row. In 2017 she did three months research on the Indigenous Congress in Mexico led by an indigenous medicine woman in the run up for the Mexican presidential elections. Geuzebroek gives talks and workshops abroad and in the Netherlands on decolonizing the climate movement. Recently she was campaign manager for the intersectional feminist political party Amsterdam BIJ1 resulting in the party’s first seat in Amsterdam municipality.


Program:

Sunday, 13.05.18
13:00 – 15:30  Workshop: The art of restoring and restorying climate politics

Diego Segatto

Diego Segatto is an architect and designer who activates and coordinates collaborative processes in the cultural and the artistic field. He focuses on diverse languages employed and combined in planning activities, privileging the visual and the textual narrative. Partaking and co-founding in collectives is for him a form of political engagement.

He is part of Campus in Camps, an educational program that activates collective critical learning environments in Palestinian refugee camps. Founded in 2012, it is a space for the production of knowledge grounded in the lived experience of its communities. In 2016, Campus in Camps took part in the Here We Are Academy, part of the project Unstated (or, Living Without Approval) at BAK, basis voor actuele kunst, Utrecht. Diego is a 2017/2018 BAK Fellow. In his fellowship he is experimenting with Al Maeishah (“the living”, in Arabic), a communal learning environment in which participants explore and practice displacement, neighbouring and hospitality as radical political acts. It creates temporary and critical platforms by
engaging in conversation with people of similar social and political urgencies.

Al Maeishah tackles with the imagination of a future beyond borders and the understanding of the challenges in prompting the common. www.diegosegatto.com


Program:

Thursday, 17.05.18
14:00 – 16:30  Workshop Al Maeishah

Flavia Dzodan

Flavia Dzodan is a writer, media analyst and cultural critic based in Amsterdam. Her work is focused on the intersections of politics, colonialism, race and gender. She teaches Critical Theory at Sandberg Institute. She is the editor of the blog “This Political Woman”, where she has written about the rise of the alt-right, Big Data, networks, algorithms and community surveillance. She has been published at Dissent Magazine, The Guardian and The Washington Post among others.


Program: 

Sunday, 13.05.18
19:30 – 21:30  Public Dialogue: Radical Solidarity and Intergenerational Coalitions

Gina Dent

Gina Dent (Ph.D., English & Comparative Literature, Columbia University) is Associate Professor of Feminist Studies, History of Consciousness, and Legal Studies at University of California, Santa Cruz.  She served previously as Director of the Institute for Advanced Feminist Research and as Principal Investigator for the UC Multicampus Research Group on Transnationalizing Justice. She is the editor of Black Popular Culture ([1993] New York: The New Press, 1998) and author of articles on race, feminism, popular culture, and visual art. Her forthcoming book Anchored to the Real: Black Literature in the Wake of Anthropology is a study of the consequences—both disabling and productive—of social science’s role in translating black writers into American literature.  Her current project grows out of her work as an advocate for human rights and prison abolition—Prison as a Border and Other Essays, on popular culture and the conditions of knowledge.  She has offered courses in critical race studies and black feminisms in Brazil (Universidade Federal da Bahia), Colombia (Universidad Nacional de Colombia), and Sweden (Linköping University) and lectures widely on these and other subjects. In June 2011, she was a member of a delegation of indigenous and women of color feminists to Palestine and speaks often from that experience.


Program: 

Sunday, 13.05.18

19:30 – 21:30  Public Dialogue: Radical Solidarity and Intergenerational Coalitions

Wednesday, 16.05.18
11:00 – 14:00  Masterclass: The idea of Africa

Wednesday, 16.05.18
19:00 – 21:00  Lecture Gina Dent: Anchored to the Real: Black Literature in the Wake of Anthropology

Gloria Wekker

Gloria Wekker is a social and cultural anthropologist, with specializations in Gender Studies, Sexuality, African – American and Caribbean Studies (UvA 1982, UCLA 1992). She was a professor in Gender Studies at the Faculty of the Humanities, Utrecht University, the Netherlands, and since 2012 she is emeritus.

She wrote The Politics of Passion; Women´s Sexual Culture in the Afro-Surinamese Diaspora (Columbia University Press, 2006), for which she received the Ruth Benedict Prize of American Anthropological Association in 2007. In 2016 White Innocence: Paradoxes of Colonialism and Race in the Netherlands (Duke University Press) created quite a stir.

Wekker has advised the Dutch government on minority, health and women’s emancipation policies. In 2015 and 2016, she was a member of the Democratization and Decentralization Commission and the chair of the Diversity Commission at the University of Amsterdam. In 2017, she was elected one of the ten most influential Dutch academics by Science Guide, and she received the prestigious, governmental Joke Smit Prize for her efforts for women’s Emancipation.


Program:

Thursday, 17.05.18
19:00 – 21:00  Keynote Lecture Angela Davis

Hodan Warsame

Hodan Warsame is an organizer working on the intersection of race, gender, class, citizenship and (de)coloniality. Among other projects, she has co-organised the Decolonize The Museum intervention at the Tropenmuseum, hosted the intersectional feminist radio show Redmond Radio and was part of the Political Fatties collective.

Program: 

Sunday, 13.05.18

19:30 – 21:30  Public Dialogue: Radical Solidarity and Intergenerational Coalitions

Isshaq Al-Barbary

Isshaq Al-barbary is a researcher who combines discourse, spatial intervention, education, collective learning and public meetings.

He is part of Campus in Camps and a 2017/2018 BAK Fellow. Campus in Camps is an educational program that activates collective critical learning environments in Palestinian refugee camps. Founded in 2012 and active within four camps in the West Bank, it is a space for the production of knowledge grounded in the lived experience of its communities.
Participant-run courses incorporate collaborations with local and international universities. In 2016, Campus in Camps took part in the Here We Are Academy, part of the project Unstated (or, Living Without Approval) at BAK, basis voor actuele kunst, Utrecht.

 www.campusincamps.ps


Program:

Thursday, 17.05.18
14:00 – 16:30  Workshop Al Maeishah

Jessica de Abreu

Jessica de Abreu (the Netherlands) has recently graduated from the department of Social and Cultural Anthropology at VU University Amsterdam. Her passionate commitment to the field of African Diaspora, led to researches on upward social mobility in New York, Amsterdam, and London. From a young age, she has been regularly involved in (and filming at) various political, social and cultural organizations that empower multicultural communities by creating self-awareness and encourage critical thinking. She currently studies Business Anthropology (international master Culture, Organization and Management) at the VU University Amsterdam, with a focus on social entrepreneurship in Black British communities and postcolonial perspectives


Program:

Monday, 14.05.18
16:00 – 19:00  Activism, Art and Education Lounge

Tueday, 15.05.18
16:00 – 19:00  Activism, Art and Education Lounge

Wednesday, 16.05.18
19:00 – 21:00  Lecture by Gina Dent Anchored to the Real: Black Literature in the Wake of Anthropology

Joy Mariama Smith

A native Philadelphian currently based in Den Haag, NL, Joy Mariama Smith’s work primarily addresses the conundrum of projected identities in various contexts. A sub-theme, or ongoing question in their work is: What is the interplay between the body and its physical environment? Rooted in socially engaged art practice, they are a performance/installation/movement artist, activist, facilitator, curator and architectural designer. They have a strong improvisational practice spanning 20 years. When they choose to teach, they actively try to uphold inclusive spaces.

*They/them/their: third person singular gender-neutral pronoun


Program:

Sunday, 13.05.18
19:30 – 21:30  Public Dialogue: Radical Solidarity and Intergenerational Coalitions

Monday, 14.05.18
10:00 – 12:00  Shame Research Lab

Wednesday, 16.05.18
10:00 – 12:00  Workshop: Moving Through Pleasure/Pleasure Activism

Maria Guggenbichler

Maria Guggenbichler is a conceptual artist; she uses social exchanges such as conversations, collaborations and jokes to find new functions for art in society. Her work is realised in ongoing and long-term dialogues and friendships. Outside institutional walls her projects create accessible, joyful and reciprocal spaces, in self-organised, informal and often domestic structures. Since 2005, Maria has collaborated with the artist Rosalie Schweiker. Together they organised a holiday for female artists (Funny Women Art, 2013); published a reader about the “fact that art institutions gladly incorporate feminism as long as it is authored by men” (Clever Men’s Art, 2014), and had a solo show under the name of a male artist (Outpost, Norwich, 2014). Since 2014, they have run a series of open gatherings in their respective homes along the question: Why do it at the Tate if you could do it in your living room? Together with curator Amal Alhaag, Maria founded the Side Room (2013-2016). At the Side Room (and occasionally at other, befriended places) Amal and Maria facilitate monthly “DJ Workshops for Women.” The Side Room is a platform for diverse actors’ intersectional feminist, queer and anti-colonial gathering, listening, learning, experimentation, dancing, DJ-ing, (re-)mixing, musings, and doings.

Program:

Saturday, 12.05.18
12:00 – 15:00  Sister, sister and friend lunch- Part II

Tuesday, 15.05.18
19:30 – 21:30  Pedagogies of Violence, Pedagogies of Care

Melvin Fraenk

Born and raised in Amsterdam, studied and performed street dance since he was a child, attended the SNDO School for New Dance Development at Amsterdam University of the Arts (2004 – 2008). He is now a professional teacher for the Jazz department Academy of Theatre and Dance, youth organizations in Amsterdam and creates choreographies for rappers and pop artists form Amsterdam and the Netherlands. Melvin has a deep interests in combining his education of street dance with contemporary models of dance using improvisation as a means to explore and mix styles. As part of his internship at the SNDO, he was able to travel, perform and teach in China (Beijing and Shanghai) and New York City. Melvin teaches regularly in Amsterdam and is a driving force for young dancers who are interested street dance activities with a creative edge.

His workshops mix urban dance with contemporary dance ideas. He influences us all to integrate dance forms in how it is we think of dancing and feel about music.


Program:

Thursday, 17.05.18
11:00 – 16:00  Music Movement Sessions by ArtBeat Amsterdam

Mitchell Esajas

Mitchell Esajas (1988) is co-founder of New Urban Collective, a social enterprise with the mission to strengthen the socioeconomic position of youth with a migrant background, especially those of African descent. He obtained a master’s degree in in Social and Cultural Anthropology and a master’s degree in Business Administration at VU University and works as a program manager and study advisor at the department of Anthropology at the University of Amsterdam. He has a strong commitment to social justice and anti-racism and is involved in organizing educational, empowerment and advocacy programs for youths, activists students and young professionals from diverse cultural backgrounds in the Netherlands and Europe. In addition, he is actively involved in the anti-Black Pete movement and the European Network for People of African Descent and European Network Against Racism.

Mitchell Esajas is co-founder of The Black Archives. A unique historical archive for inspiring conversations, activities and literature from Black and other perspectives that are often overlooked elsewhere. The Black Archives documents the history of black emancipation movements and individuals in the Netherlands. The Black Archives is managed by the New Urban Collective.


Program:

Monday, 14.05.18
16:00 – 19:00  Activism, Art and Education Lounge

Tueday, 15.05.18
16:00 – 19:00  Activism, Art and Education Lounge

Wednesday, 16.05.18
19:00 – 21:00  Lecture by Gina Dent Anchored to the Real: Black Literature in the Wake of Anthropology

Nancy Jouwe

Nancy Jouwe (Delft, 1967) is a cultural historian and gender specialist and has worked since 1993 in the NGO sector as a manager, director and curator, with a focus on women’s rights and arts, heritage and intercultural dialogue. She co-founded Amsterdam-based art hub Framer Framed and stood at the basis of research project Mapping Slavery in the Netherlands, a transnational research project that maps the Dutch colonial history of slavery.

As an activist she’s been involved in the ‘80s and ‘90s with local squatters and transnational queer, indigenous, and women’s movements, incl. in South East Asia and the South Pacific. She comes from a family of political refugees that had the flee Indonesia in the beginning of the 60s.

In 2013 she returned to academia to do research and started in 2017 with her PHD. She currently lectures at Amsterdam University College, Utrecht University, Willem de Kooning Art Academy and CIEE on colonial history, Black feminism, globalization, visual culture, and race.

She co-edited with Gloria Wekker and Maaykbe Botman a volume on the Black, Migrant and Refugee Women’s movement in The Netherlands, called Caleidoscopische Visies (2001). Her latest publications include Amsterdam Slavery Heritage Guide (2014), Paradijsvogels in de Polder (2012), Dutch New York Histories (2017) plus articles on intersectionality, race and gender.


Program:

Wednesday, 16.05.18
19:00 – 21:00  Lecture by Gina Dent Anchored to the Real: Black Literature in the Wake of Anthropology

Native Moons

Native Moons is a distinctive collective consisting of three female artists: Sarada Sarita Keilman, Yordana Rodriguez and Kim Tawjoeram. With a united passion for music, art and dance, they share the same state of mind: “When we dance we are free, and when we are free, we dance”. They express this vision in the underground dance scene as well as in the theatre.

They teach in different styles of dance like Waacking, Popping, Housedance, Vogue and Hip Hop. For this workshop Sarita will teach a Waacking class and Yordana and Kim will teach a Freestyle class. Important in their classes is to feel free, playful, passionate and joyful.


Program:

Tuesday, 15.05.18
9:00 – 12:00  Workshop: Native Moons Waacking and Freestyle

Nawal Mustafa

Nawal Mustafa obtained a master’s degree in Human Rights Law from the University of Groningen. She migrated with her family to the Netherlands in 1995 as a result of the civil war in Somalia. Nawal has worked actively with organizations such as Amnesty International, Humanity in Action, and Critical Mass. She is currently pursuing a PhD at the Vrije Universiteit van Amsterdam where she conducts research on how mixed relationships have been regulated in the past. She also works at the Universiteit van Amsterdam as Talent Development Coordinator for the bachelor degree Politics, Psychology, Law and Economics.

Program:

Sunday, 13.05.18
19:30 – 21:30  Public Dialogue: Radical Solidarity and Intergenerational Coalitions

Olave Basabose

Olave Basabose is a self-identified non-binary trans femme, activist, politician, lawyer, and writer of Burundian origin. Olave migrated to the Netherlands with her family in the 1990s. She obtained a Law degree from Leiden University and currently resides in The Hague, where she works to protect the rights and freedom of sexual minorities in the Netherlands. Olave participated as a candidate for Sylvana Simons’ party Artikel 1 and most recently for the Haagse Stadspartij. She is a co-author of ZWART.


Program:

Sunday, 13.05.18
19:30 – 21:30  Public Dialogue: Radical Solidarity and Intergenerational Coalitions

The One Minutes

The One Minutes is a global network devoted to moving image. Since 1998, The One Minutes has produced and distributed over 17,000 video works by artists from more than 120 countries.
Every month, The One Minutes Foundation puts out a new series of 60-second films that investigate how we perceive and engage with moving image. Museums and cultural organisations around the world subscribe to the series.

In February this year, the One Minutes Series called Public Justice were curated by Quinsy Gario. What is justice? What can you say about injustice? How to pursue a just world? The answers to these questions cannot be presented in a vacuum but must be done in public. Gario invited artists and filmmakers to propose works of one minute shot in public space commenting on justice. He also selected films from the vast The One Minutes Collection.

The screening of Public Justice series within the Moving Together is courtesy of the One Minutes.


Program:

Monday, 14.05.18
16:00 – 19:00  Activism, Art and Education Lounge

Tuesday, 15.05.18
16:00 – 19:00  Activism, Art and Education Lounge

Rae Parnell

Rae Parnell (aka RaeZor Beam) is a researcher, writer, and educator based in the Hague, NL. They do healing work and community building through workshop facilitation, and use the process of zine making to archive queer and trans communities of color. They are involved in a number of community based projects in the Hague including The Hang-Out 070, an LGBT youth organization, and BARTALK, an interdisciplinary lecture performance series.

Program:

Monday, 14.05.18
16:00 – 19:00  Zine making workshop – Activism, Art and Education Lounge

Tuesday, 15.05.18
16:00 – 19:00  Zine making workshop – Activism, Art and Education Lounge

Sepake Angiama

Sepake Angiama is a curator and educator, whose interest lies in discursive practices, the social framework, and how we shape and form our experience in understanding the world. This has inspired her to work with artists who disrupt or provoke aspects of the social sphere through action, design, dance, and architecture. While in her position as Head of Education, Documenta 14 she initiated the project Under the Mango Tree: Sites of Learning in cooperation with ifa (Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen) which gathers artist-led spaces, libraries and schools interested in unfolding discourses around decolonizing education practices that destabilize the European canon, through examining alternative epistemologies, notions of unlearning and indigenous knowledge. Previously she was the Head of Education for Manifesta 10 hosted by the Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg. She is currently a Fellow for BAK, Utrecht (basis voor actuele kunst) where she addresses through her research, Her Imaginary, how science fiction and feminism may harness the perfect tools for capturing a pedagogy of political and social imagination.

 

Program:

Wednesday, 16.05.18
14:00 – 16:30  Workshop: Letter from the Future

SRP - Studenten voor Rechtvaardigheid in Palestina

Studenten voor Rechtvaardigheid in Palestina (SRP) is een organisatie van studenten die zich inzetten voor Palestina. SRP steunt de Boycot, Desinvesteren & Sancties (BDS) beweging en haar doelen: het recht op terugkeer voor de zeven miljoen Palestijnse vluchtelingen, de sloop van de Apartheidsmuur en de beëindiging van de Israëlische bezetting en apartheid.

Specifiek richt SRP zich op de banden tussen Nederlandse scholen en universiteiten met Israël. Nederlandse scholen en universiteit zouden niet mee moeten werken aan het normaliseren van de bezetting en dus ophouden om te opereren als verlengstuk van de Israëlische staat.

SRP is voor het stopzetten van academische reizen en uitwisselingen naar/met Israël en Israëlische instellingen, voor het verbreken van banden tussen scholen en universiteiten met bedrijven die profiteren van de bezetting, en voor een beëindiging van formele samenwerkingsverbanden met Israëlisch academische instellingen.

 

Program:

Sunday, 13.05.18
16:00 – 18:00  SRP Workshop

Tirsa With

Tirsa With is a 20 year old activist and poet. She is a board member of the political party BIJ1 and the founding chair of its youth branch, RADICAAL. She is currently pursuing an honours BA in sociology and cultural studies at Amsterdam University College. Tirsa loosely identifies as Surinamese, Dutch, woman, genderqueer, queer and black feminist. She started writing as an act of self-care, which results in poetry that is personal, melancholic and socially critical.


Program:

Thursday, 17.05.18
19:00 – 21:00  Keynote Lecture Angela Davis

Tom van Wee

Tom van Wee is a dancer at heart but passionate about composing. In his own words: ‘I always had a love for music whether it was listening or attempting to create. Some years ago I started working with Ableton and I haven’t stopped making music ever since. Choreographers took an interest in my work and hired me to arrange their soundscapes, this allowed me to combine movement and sound.’


Program:

Thursday, 17.05.18
11:00 – 16:00 – Music Movement Sessions by ArtBeat Amsterdam

ZAMI

For more than 25 years, Zami has been at the forefront of raising awareness, creating leadership and providing a framework for the identity of Black, migrant and refugee women in the Netherlands. It has focused on their empowerment and participation in Dutch society.

Zami offers a political and cultural platform for all Black, migrant, and refugee women in the Netherlands. Although based in Amsterdam, it is a national organization that collaborates with different societal organizations in the Netherland’s four biggest cities (Movisie, FNV-Vrouw, Women Inc., MilColores and COC) to strengthen the position of women of color and increase their public representation in society. Zami has remained a unique organization by offering a space to women from diverse social, ethnic and religious communities. Women who distinguish themselves by their differences, but who build bridges to enhance their position and participation in Dutch society.


Program:

Monday, 14.05.18
19:30 – 21:30  ZAMI F-LAB